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Stinky Little Gods [1995]

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TRACKLISTING

  1. Kettles Of Doom
  2. Joke Shop
  3. Von Deuce
  4. Captain Evil
  5. Pressure For Posture
  6. Nightmares Are Essential
  7. Gargle
  8. Salt Chunk Mary's
  9. Highway 86
  10. Corn On The Macabre

Fatso Jetson debut album
Recorded and Mixed by Mike Thuney and Fatso Jetson at Rhythm and Brews, Indio, California

Band

Mario Lalli: Guitar, Vocals, Lap Steel Guitar
Tony Tornay: Drums
Larry Lalli: Bass

Album Reviews

This debut from Fatso Jetson of Palm Desert, CA, is as refreshingly direct and uncareerist as rock can get. Guitarist/vocalist Mario Lalli, bassist Larry Lalli, and drummer Tony Tornay bring their own surf, punk, and country angles to the psychedelic explorations on Stinky Little Gods. Fans curious about stoner rock's heritage would do well to check out this and every recording from desert rock godfathers the Lalli cousins, who influenced stoner superheroes Kyuss while playing in desert bar bands like Englenook and Yawning Man. Fans of Josh Homme's fluid soloing on Kyuss and Queens of the Stone Age discs will enjoy and recognize the guitar stylings on "Corn on the Macabre," just one of the five instrumental tracks that reveal Lalli's talent for combining punk anti-music with all out jam rock to create the big, primal, desert sound. Mario Lalli's vocal approach differs significantly from many of the genres subsequent practitioners. Eschewing '70s blues riffs, Mario Lalli's voice and lyrics echo his punk influence as strongly as his guitar playing reflects surf and psychedelia. Taking the apocalyptic imagery to comedic extreme, "Kettle of Doom" sums up Fatso Jetson's half-serious lyrical message: "Losing streak, bad plan, leave it out, your Loss, flush it down." What seems like random negativity actually comes off as clever and distinctive when Mario Lalli's one-note imagery combines with Fatso Jetson's regional blend of surf, punk, and hard rock. With its intelligence, modesty, and musical commitment, Stinky Little Gods more than confirms Fatso Jetson's towering influence over the most artistic movement in heavy rock since it's post-psychedelic '70s inception.